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Tuesday, January 6, 2009

Lord of the Harvest

Tuesday, January 6, 2009
As a father I feel closer to this aspect out of all others. Like me the Harvest Lord is prepared to give it all up to protect his children and to provide for them.

Rede of the Lord of the Harvest

I am the aging man toiling day after day to provide for his children. I am the Father who regardless of his worries always has a smile for his fellow man. I am the Earth aging and giving up its last crop. Yet I am also the promise of life unending even into Death. I am true love made real by a willing sacrifice. I am the yellow corn that gives life to the masses.

But still I am feared because I bring death soon, robed in black I bring the scythe that cuts down the wheat. Yet do not worry for does not the wheat continue your life? See my willing death in the waning sun and the leaves turning crimson and orange.

Yet remember my death is willing for in my death I end the battle between Son and Father and I spare the Earth. Look for me on the other side of this world in Summerland for I will be there to guide the souls of the dead and give them a chance at rebirth
Aspects

He is our Father, ruler of the Earth's bounty and of the High Places. That grain that grows, yet also the scythe that cuts it down. He is Life and Death and the bridge between the two. For He is the grain in life and in death he is still the grain that gives us new life. He is the provider that walks that line, willing to sacrifice all, including himself, to provide for his family.

The Lord of the Harvest is also the patron of the arts and crafts. Lugh was example of this, associated by the Romans with Mercury, because of his patronship of the arts and of all crafts and skills. He was also the god of traveling, money and commerce.

Romano-Celtic images of Lugh show a bearded, mature and handsome man, carrying the symbols of the caduceus and purse, accompanied by his totems; the ram, cock and tortoise. He was often shown accompanied by Rosmerta or Maia, representing wealth and material benefit. Such companionship parallels the old Celtic custom of the marriage of the king to the material goddess of the land.

The Greek historian Diodorus Siculus wrote of a version of the myth of Osiris. In this myth Osiris is described as an ancient king who taught the Egyptians the arts of civilization, including agriculture. Eventually Osiris is murdered by his evil brother Set who cuts the body of Osiris into twenty-six pieces. The great mystery festival of Osiris began at Abydos on the 17th of Athyr (November 13th) which commemorated the death of the god, which is also the same day that grain was planted in the ground. The resurrection of the god symbolized the rebirth of the grain. This aspect is representative of the ability of all things to be reborn. Remember all that falls shall rise again. Turn to the Lord of the Harvest when you feel you are at the end of your rope and look for the hope of rebirth, it is never that far.

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